Remove and disable “Get Windows 10” icon

Microsoft seems to have pushed an automatic update to Windows 7/8/8.1 machines with an annoying popup in the notification tray exclaiming that you need to reserve your copy of Windows 10 immediately. If you’re like me, you wanted to figure out how to kill this thing for good. There’s a few ways you can do it. There’s a temporary until reboot way and a permanent way.

Temporary

On Windows 8.1, go to the Task Manager (right click the Task Bar, click Task Manager) or CTRL+ALT+DEL and then click Task Manager. The process you want to kill under the “Details” tab is called GWX.exe. Once you stop that process, the icon will go away. Be warned that it will come back when you reboot your machine.

Permanent

  1. Open the Control Panel and click Windows Update.
  2. Click Installed Updates in the lower left.
  3. Find the update named “KB3035583”, right click it, and uninstall.
  4. Go to “C:\Windows\System32\” in an Explorer window
  5. Right click the “GWX” folder, click Properties and then the Security tab
  6. Click Advanced and then click the “Change” button next to the Owner
  7. Change the user to your account or group that you use on the computer
  8. Click OK/Apply and then delete the “GWX” folder

Your computer is now free from that annoying popup, but make sure to hide the update in the Windows Update window if it ever comes back asking to be installed. This is a good time to remind everyone that they should set their Windows Update settings to Manual Installation so that you don’t get stuck with these botched updates automatically.… Read more

Ripping Blu-Rays and DVDs to a Media Server

Hardware needed:

  • PC
  • BD-ROM / DVD-ROM
  • Large Hard Drive (mine is 2 TB)

Software needed:

Media is increasingly migrating towards streaming-only distribution. Discs, even BD/HD-DVD formats, have rather low limits on the amount of data that can be stored on each. These low limits and the increasing availability of high-speed and high-bandwidth internet connections are just two reasons that consumers have begun to rely on streaming digital content including movies, music, videos, and pictures. The convenience of streaming services like Netflix and Hulu allow consumers to avoid commercials and watch what they want and when they want. Products like DVR and TiVo are only band-aids on top of the real problem: cable companies disallowing customers to choose their own content at convenient times.

Just think about what you have to do in order to watch your DVDs and Blu-Rays. I have Blu-Rays in my possession that literally take 5 minutes just to load the main menu. This problem is magnified by useless services like BD-Live that require internet connectivity in order to load content like chat rooms and trailers that users may never even use. For users like me, I want to be able to access my content immediately and in the format of my choosing. The current implementation of HD media inconveniences consumers by disallowing various viewing options and restricting Blu-Rays to only existing on the original disc. In fact, the legality of copying  Blu-Rays for personal use even when creating simple backups is questionable because of the insane policies of the MPAA and the legislative pockets that they influence.

Unless you’re sharing and distributing your backups, I sincerely doubt any authority is going to care. The MPAA and other organizations that rely on Blu-Ray sales isn’t losing a single penny if you backup your physical media. You’ve already legally purchased the disc and are simply transferring the contents to a device of your choosing. Continue at your own discretion and follow these steps. Keep in mind that MakeMKV is not going to perform any transcoding of your content. The original video/audio codecs will be left untouched and will simply be transferred to a .mkv container.

  1. Download and install MakeMKV from the link above.
  2. Download and install Handbrake from the link above. (optional)
  3. Download and install VLC Player from the link above. (optional)
  4. Start up MakeMKV.
  5. Insert the DVD or Blu-Ray of your choice into your BD-ROM/DVD-ROM drive.
  6. Wait for MakeMKV to scan the disc and then click the big Disc –> HDD icon.
  7. Wait for MakeMKV to scan for titles, video, audio, and subtitles.
  8. Check and uncheck the desired contents to be included in the final .mkv output file. (I will write another post about specifics on video/audio codecs and subtitles.)
  9. Change the output path in the right panel and click the button to the right of the output path.
  10. Wait for MakeMKV to complete the process and transfer the final output to the shared folder of your media server.
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Windows Vista – Moving C:Users to Another Location

Moving your personal documents to a location other than the system partition is a good idea for several reasons. Namely, if your system crashes, you can format and reinstall Windows without affecting your personal files or requiring you to move them to another location. Of course, this does not work if the entire drive crashes and takes your personal files with it!

Follow these steps (D: is the name of my location, change it to match yours):

  1. Backup your C:Users folder to an external location
  2. Boot from Windows Vista install DVD
  3. Click “Repair” from main install screen
  4. Click Command Prompt
      • robocopy C:Users D:Users /mir /xj
      • rmdir /S /Q C:Users
      • rmdir “C:Documents and Settings”
      • mklink /J C:Users D:Users
      • mklink /J “C:Documents and Settings” D:Users
      1. Reboot

      You’ll notice that C:Users now has an arrow on its icon designating that it is a link to another location. Remember to set proper permissions and remove read-only status from the new D:Users so all applications work properly!… Read more