ASP.NET Web Services

NOTE: Microsoft no longer suggests using this method of web services, but it is useful knowledge if you are supporting legacy systems or are still required to implement these features for business purposes. This method of web service is still useful for internal operations that do not require high security.

Below is an overview image of common web service architectures. It’s easiest to think of web services at “web methods” contained within a “web library” that contains methods to be executed on a server. The strength of this approach is that all communication is done in a standard XML format, regardless of the platforms communicating. This allows for brand new systems to communicate with extremely legacy systems, assuming that each system can properly implement a valid SOAP request and response according to the WSDL contract.

Client: Any application that requires consumption of whatever methods the web service is exposing.
Web Server: A process that hosts the web services for consumption.
Broker: Provides the definition of the web services being exposed.
SOAP: XML formatted request and results containing data according to the WSDL (see below.)
WSDL: Definition language describing which method to execute, what parameters the method requires, what data types the parameters are, what results will be returned from the web service, and what data type to expect back from the web service.

A common SOAP request with a body but no header. Note that the method being executed is defined in the <m:GetStockPrice> tag and the parameters passed are described in the <m:StockName> tag.

A common SOAP response with a body but no header. Note that the response being returned is defined in the <m:GetStockPriceResponse> tag and the return value is described in the <m:StockNamResponsee> tag.

Stay tuned for the next post which will include how to create a web service client and server in Visual Studio 2008 using C#.

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